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Promise Rings: The gift she will never forget

Posted by Abigail Moses on

Here at Avita Jewellery, we think that taking the plunge and investing in a promise ring for your significant other is a sign of love and affection, though, rather confusing when there’s so many different types of rings to choose from. From purity rings, and commitment rings, to pre-engagement rings and promise rings, it’s easy to see why couples find the shopping process overwhelming 

Eager to clear this up, here are a few facts and tips for those looking to make that promise. 

What is a promise ring? 

You may well know that engagement rings and wedding rings are usually worn on the fourth finger of the left hand. This is a tradition born from the beliefs of ancient Greeks and Romans who thought there is a vein; known as the 'Vena Amoris' – or the 'Vein of Love' that runs from within that finger directly to the heart. The wearing of rings on this particular finger also symbolises a love without end, illustrating the importance of the sanctity of marriage.  

However, the meaning of a promise ring can vary from couple to couple. Although similarly to traditional engagement and wedding rings, they are usually given as a token and a symbol of commitment. Some couples use a promise ring to hint on a future engagement, and others use the piece of jewellery to reflect their relationship and devotion to each other. 

A promise ring basically does what is says on the tin. It suggests a promise is being made in the relationship, signifying that as a couple you are more than “just dating”. The ring can be used as a physical symbol to show the outside world of the partnership you have. At Avita, we’ve noticed an emerging trend in promise rings amongst couples that want to show their commitment but aren’t yet ready for marriage. 

The origin of the promise ring 

The notion that a promise ring stands for undying love dates back several hundred years. The promise ring was originally named the ‘posy ring’, which were worn for the exact same reasons as a promise ring but with engraved romantic poetry. It’s been traditional to wear a ring on the fourth finger of the left hand since the ancient times. Although, promise rings have become hugely popular within the past decade. The majority of people think this is due to them becoming a trend with celebrities such as Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers. Some famous owners of promise rings use the bands as a form of promising themselves to God;  Something that often gets confused amongst the mainstream trend. This kind of commitment is usually gifted and used by wearing a purity ring, not a promise ring - although they are both declaring a vital partnership. 

Promise ring etiquette 

Promise rings are generally given after a few years of dating, when the couple are sure that they are committed and serious about one another. With regards to the sort of style, the common themes of a promise ring varies from hearts, to intertwined features in order to connote the union of two individuals. Most couples tend to go for a design that will eventually be completely different to the future engagement ring. Both rings serve a purpose, though many do not want both pieces to be at all similar. 

Different to engagement rings, there aren’t any rules at all when it comes to budgets. You should spend as much or as little as you like, but people generally spend significantly less. Most of the time this is because someone wouldn’t keep wearing a promise ring after an engagement. Additionally, they are almost always sold at a cheaper price as they are utilised by younger buyers who do not yet have the financial means to spend money on an expensive engagement ring. 

There is absolutely no correct or incorrect way to give your significant other a promise ring. The conventional ‘on one bended knee’ doesn't usually happen, but many do decide to give someone a promise ring on Valentine’s Day or a birthday. The gesture usually involves a meal for two and a discussion about the promise that is being made. 

For most couples a promise ring does usually lead to an engagement. So, if you are looking for a promise ring, take a look at our beautiful selection here at https://www.avitajewellery.co.uk/collections/promise-rings. Avita promise rings are all individually hand crafted and made in London. Created with gold and real gemstones, they are guaranteed to make that special promise a moment to remember.

Read more

Promise Rings: The gift she will never forget

Posted by Abigail Moses on

Here at Avita Jewellery, we think that taking the plunge and investing in a promise ring for your significant other is a sign of love and affection, though, rather confusing when there’s so many different types of rings to choose from. From purity rings, and commitment rings, to pre-engagement rings and promise rings, it’s easy to see why couples find the shopping process overwhelming 

Eager to clear this up, here are a few facts and tips for those looking to make that promise. 

What is a promise ring? 

You may well know that engagement rings and wedding rings are usually worn on the fourth finger of the left hand. This is a tradition born from the beliefs of ancient Greeks and Romans who thought there is a vein; known as the 'Vena Amoris' – or the 'Vein of Love' that runs from within that finger directly to the heart. The wearing of rings on this particular finger also symbolises a love without end, illustrating the importance of the sanctity of marriage.  

However, the meaning of a promise ring can vary from couple to couple. Although similarly to traditional engagement and wedding rings, they are usually given as a token and a symbol of commitment. Some couples use a promise ring to hint on a future engagement, and others use the piece of jewellery to reflect their relationship and devotion to each other. 

A promise ring basically does what is says on the tin. It suggests a promise is being made in the relationship, signifying that as a couple you are more than “just dating”. The ring can be used as a physical symbol to show the outside world of the partnership you have. At Avita, we’ve noticed an emerging trend in promise rings amongst couples that want to show their commitment but aren’t yet ready for marriage. 

The origin of the promise ring 

The notion that a promise ring stands for undying love dates back several hundred years. The promise ring was originally named the ‘posy ring’, which were worn for the exact same reasons as a promise ring but with engraved romantic poetry. It’s been traditional to wear a ring on the fourth finger of the left hand since the ancient times. Although, promise rings have become hugely popular within the past decade. The majority of people think this is due to them becoming a trend with celebrities such as Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers. Some famous owners of promise rings use the bands as a form of promising themselves to God;  Something that often gets confused amongst the mainstream trend. This kind of commitment is usually gifted and used by wearing a purity ring, not a promise ring - although they are both declaring a vital partnership. 

Promise ring etiquette 

Promise rings are generally given after a few years of dating, when the couple are sure that they are committed and serious about one another. With regards to the sort of style, the common themes of a promise ring varies from hearts, to intertwined features in order to connote the union of two individuals. Most couples tend to go for a design that will eventually be completely different to the future engagement ring. Both rings serve a purpose, though many do not want both pieces to be at all similar. 

Different to engagement rings, there aren’t any rules at all when it comes to budgets. You should spend as much or as little as you like, but people generally spend significantly less. Most of the time this is because someone wouldn’t keep wearing a promise ring after an engagement. Additionally, they are almost always sold at a cheaper price as they are utilised by younger buyers who do not yet have the financial means to spend money on an expensive engagement ring. 

There is absolutely no correct or incorrect way to give your significant other a promise ring. The conventional ‘on one bended knee’ doesn't usually happen, but many do decide to give someone a promise ring on Valentine’s Day or a birthday. The gesture usually involves a meal for two and a discussion about the promise that is being made. 

For most couples a promise ring does usually lead to an engagement. So, if you are looking for a promise ring, take a look at our beautiful selection here at https://www.avitajewellery.co.uk/collections/promise-rings. Avita promise rings are all individually hand crafted and made in London. Created with gold and real gemstones, they are guaranteed to make that special promise a moment to remember.

Read more


The History of the Engagement Ring

Posted by Dijay Soni on

As a symbol of love along with our intention to get married, the engagement ring is surely one of the most beautiful and meaningful pieces of jewellery that we will ever own. With the emphasis usually on diamonds, the giving and receiving of the engagement ring has to be one of life’s greatest moments.

wedding propsal

But why is a ring the jewellery piece that we have come to associate with the proposal to be married?

If we go back in time to when men grunted and hunted and lived in a cave, cavemen would braid grass and then tie this around his beloved’s wrists, ankles and waist, believing that this submission would make her succumb to his somewhat primeval charm.

By 2800 B.C. we see the first signs of a ring becoming a sign of togetherness with the exuberant Egyptians being buried with wired rings on the 3rd finger of the left hand with the belief that this would directly connect to the heart via the ‘Vena Amoris’ (literally translated to the ‘vein of love’).

And go forward to the 2nd century B.C. and the Romans are known to give their partner a gold ring that is worn on special occasions as well as at the wedding ceremony which is then replaced by an iron ring to wear as a representation of him owning his wife. This is the beginnings of both an ‘engagement’ ring and ‘wedding’ ring.

As time advances, differing cultures have their own versions that symbolise romantic partnerships – in Asia they give a puzzle ring, and in 1217 the Bishop of Salisbury makes a ring made of rushes a symbol of legal marriage.

But by far the most important date in terms of the modern day engagement ring is 1477, when Archduke Maximilian of Austria asks Mary of Burgundy to be his wife by giving her a ring in the shape of the letter ‘M’ that is set with diamonds, and so the love affair with the diamond engagement ring begins.

mary bagfirst engagement ring

During the 18th and 19th centuries, diamonds are discovered in South Africa and Brazil and this means that there is now a readily available diamond supply worldwide, with the DeBeers Mining Company dominating the industry. With a marketing campaign that used the phrase “A Diamond is Forever” capturing the imagination, the tradition of a diamond engagement ring was well and truly established.

Today’s diamond engagement rings come in a wide range of styles that go beyond the solitaire, with the current trend taking a lot of inspiration from the vintage look.

Whatever style you are looking for, Avita are happy to help find the perfect engagement ring for your proposal, with not a single blade of grass, iron or wire in sight.

Read more

The History of the Engagement Ring

Posted by Dijay Soni on

As a symbol of love along with our intention to get married, the engagement ring is surely one of the most beautiful and meaningful pieces of jewellery that we will ever own. With the emphasis usually on diamonds, the giving and receiving of the engagement ring has to be one of life’s greatest moments.

wedding propsal

But why is a ring the jewellery piece that we have come to associate with the proposal to be married?

If we go back in time to when men grunted and hunted and lived in a cave, cavemen would braid grass and then tie this around his beloved’s wrists, ankles and waist, believing that this submission would make her succumb to his somewhat primeval charm.

By 2800 B.C. we see the first signs of a ring becoming a sign of togetherness with the exuberant Egyptians being buried with wired rings on the 3rd finger of the left hand with the belief that this would directly connect to the heart via the ‘Vena Amoris’ (literally translated to the ‘vein of love’).

And go forward to the 2nd century B.C. and the Romans are known to give their partner a gold ring that is worn on special occasions as well as at the wedding ceremony which is then replaced by an iron ring to wear as a representation of him owning his wife. This is the beginnings of both an ‘engagement’ ring and ‘wedding’ ring.

As time advances, differing cultures have their own versions that symbolise romantic partnerships – in Asia they give a puzzle ring, and in 1217 the Bishop of Salisbury makes a ring made of rushes a symbol of legal marriage.

But by far the most important date in terms of the modern day engagement ring is 1477, when Archduke Maximilian of Austria asks Mary of Burgundy to be his wife by giving her a ring in the shape of the letter ‘M’ that is set with diamonds, and so the love affair with the diamond engagement ring begins.

mary bagfirst engagement ring

During the 18th and 19th centuries, diamonds are discovered in South Africa and Brazil and this means that there is now a readily available diamond supply worldwide, with the DeBeers Mining Company dominating the industry. With a marketing campaign that used the phrase “A Diamond is Forever” capturing the imagination, the tradition of a diamond engagement ring was well and truly established.

Today’s diamond engagement rings come in a wide range of styles that go beyond the solitaire, with the current trend taking a lot of inspiration from the vintage look.

Whatever style you are looking for, Avita are happy to help find the perfect engagement ring for your proposal, with not a single blade of grass, iron or wire in sight.

Read more